The pandemic has forced the mental health community to evolve

Updated: Apr 29

Summary of: As pandemic drags on, mental health clients, services adapt published on HeraldNet, April 27, 2020.


Key Points:

  • At-home exercise and long walks for those who need help coping during these trying times

  • When exercise is not enough to help, crisis lines, urgent care, and online support groups are available


After her diagnosis of enduring Bipolar disorder while in prison, Megan Amaya began advocating for increased access to services for mental health issues and now serves on the board for NAMI Snohomish County, a local chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

The current stay-at-home order has forced Amaya to struggle with her mental health and, at times, has brought about thoughts of wanting to have a drink. But Amaya is not alone. The Coronavirus pandemic has impacted many people’s mental health, whether or not they have a mental illness.

Amaya recommends at-home exercise and long walks for those who need help coping during these trying times. But when exercise is not enough to help, crisis lines, urgent care, and online support groups are available.

Here are some resources for Snohomish County:


Volunteers of America runs a crisis phone line and messaging platform

The Trevor Project provides crisis options and other resources for LGBTQ+ youth, including a phone line, online chat service, and confidential text messaging

  • Available 24/7, thetrevorproject.org/get-help-now

Providence Regional Medical Center Everett, behavioral health urgent care center still open for walk-in visits

  • Available at 425-261-4210 to adults 18+, experiencing a mental health emergency

Mill Creek Family Services video therapy with up to 30 staff members

Compass Health has moved 62% of its services online

  • Open to everyone but mostly works with those who use Medicaid

Read more on HeraldNet.

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© 2020 by DC Intervention, a 20K Strategies affiliate.